Children’s Health

In a recent study published in the Heart Rhythm journal, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, assessed the relationship between different types of inhaled marijuana or tobacco product usage with ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. The impact of conventional tobacco smoking on coronary artery disorder is well understood. However, the effects of smoking on
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After retrospectively analyzing the data of over 300,000 people, researchers in a recent Neurology journal paper report that a diagnosis of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was associated with a greater risk of both seizures and epilepsy as compared to those diagnosed with influenza infection. Study: Incidence of Epilepsy and Seizures Over the First 6 Months After a
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In a recent study published in The Lancet Regional Health – Americas, journal researchers examined the impact of the financial stress associated with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the mental health of adolescents in the United States (U.S.). Study: COVID-19-related financial strain and adolescent mental health. Image Credit: Astafjeva / Shutterstock Background Related Stories Apart
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Uptake of national guidelines for the treatment of children hospitalized with COVID-19 fell well below what would typically be expected, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and elsewhere in Pediatrics. The researchers looked at the medical records of children with COVID-19 at 42 children’s hospitals across the country before and after
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Don’t spank your kids. That’s the conventional wisdom that has emerged from decades of research linking corporal punishment to a decline in adolescent health and negative effects on behavior, including an increased risk for anxiety and depression. Now, a new study explores how corporal punishment might impact neural systems to produce those adverse effects. Corporal
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The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that infants are breastfed for at least the first six months of life and that breastfeeding is continued, along with the gradual introduction of complementary food, for two years or more. Study: Milk Antibody Response after 3rd Dose of COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine and SARS-CoV-2 Breakthrough Infection and Implications for Infant
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Breastfed babies are believed to suffer fewer allergic conditions, like eczema and food allergies, than formula-fed babies; yet the reason has not been well understood. Now, a new study by Penn State College of Medicine finds that small molecules found in most humans’ breast milk may reduce the likelihood of infants developing allergic conditions like
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Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered how obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) changes the profiles of immune cells in the blood, leading to a unique cellular signature that can accurately detect obstructive sleep apnea in children. OSA affects 22 million people in the U.S. including children. More than 10% of all
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Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found disparities in the completion of follow-up concussion care, particularly among pediatric patients who are publicly insured and identify as Black, suggesting barriers to care exist. The findings, recently published in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, will help inform research funded by a newly awarded grant from
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Adolescents who underwent sleeve gastrectomy, a type of weight-loss surgery that involves removing part of the stomach, were less likely to go the emergency room or be admitted to the hospital in the five years after their operations than those who had their stomachs divided into pouches through gastric bypass surgery, according to new research.
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Public Health authorities have warned health care workers to be on the alert for polio, yet most physicians will not be familiar with presentation of this highly infectious, life-threatening disease. An article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.221320 outlines five things to know about polio. The oral polio vaccine is used internationally, but not
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The review underpins the inspectorate’s new strategic focus on early education and giving children ‘the best start in life’ following the Covid-19 pandemic. Today’s report draws on a range of published research to consider how early years practitioners deliver high-quality education for children from birth to 4 years old. Read the report ‘Best start in
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Research from Queen’s University Belfast suggests that deaf children are more at risk of developing mental health and emotional wellbeing issues compared to children who can hear. The research report ‘The Emotional Wellbeing of Deaf Children and Young’ by Dr Bronagh Byrne and Dr Catherine McNamee, from the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social
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Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety were more likely in adolescents exposed to war than those living outside the war-affected region in Ukraine. The unique study conducted by the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry of the University of Turku is the largest epidemiological study using standardized measures that examined the impact of the Russia-Ukraine
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Today we are surrounded by artificial chemicals, both those introduced deliberately and those that contaminate the environment inadvertently as a consequence of their use in other applications. Study: Effects of mercury exposure on fetal body burden and its association with growth of infants. Image Credit: SciePro/Shutterstock Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are of special concern, especially when
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Social determinants of health affect the outcomes of many illnesses, and pediatric cancer is no exception. In fact, children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) living in poverty are significantly more likely to relapse and die from their disease than those from wealthier backgrounds. While socioeconomic status often influences survival outcomes, children with relapsed/refractory ALL treated
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Infection with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of respiratory illness among both infants and young children throughout the world, as well as the most common cause of infant hospitalizations in the United States. Although RSV cases typically peak between December and February, RSV hospitalizations are reaching similarly high levels much
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