Children’s Health

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 13 2020 The Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP),the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) aim to clearly reassure pregnant women that the article “Association Between Epidural Analgesia During
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 13 2020 The authors, two surgeon-researchers from Murayama Medical Center in Tokyo, tested a device that, when attached to everyday eyeglasses, can display fluoroscopic images used for surgical guidance directly to the surgeon. Without such a device, the surgeon must receive this guidance by repeatedly looking across the operating room
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 13 2020 UCLA researchers say a blood test commonly used to detect fetal genetic abnormalities may help predict complications associated with pregnancy before symptoms develop. Their preliminary study, appearing in Epigenetics, links certain cell-free DNA signatures to adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including ischemic placental disease and gestational diabetes. The findings
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 12 2020 Mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection rarely transmit the virus to their newborns when basic infection-control practices are followed, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital. The findings–the most detailed data available on the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 12 2020 Traditionally, geneticists divide disorders into “simple,” where a single gene mutation causes disease, or complex, where mutations in many genes contribute modest amounts. A new study suggests that the truth is somewhere in between. For many years, scientists studying patient genomes have gained glimpses of genetic “burden” or
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 Neuroscientists have found new evidence that learning to play an instrument may be good for the brain. Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding, executive functions known to be associated with
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 CooperVision is reporting the latest findings from its landmark MiSight® 1 day clinical study, providing new insights about myopia management and the proven efficacy of the specially designed contact lens. Among many powerful outcomes are that nearly one in four children’s eyes originally fit with MiSight® 1 day
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Oct 9 2020 A natural treatment for an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection that causes blindness in infants can be effectively administered through a simple eye drop without causing irritation, Kingston University researchers have found. A research team from Kingston University has been exploring the potential of antimicrobial agent monocaprin as an alternative to antibiotic treatments for
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 Rotavirus (RV) is an extremely contagious viral infection and the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and children worldwide. The World Health Organization reports that more than 215,000 children under the age of 5 die of a vaccine-preventable rotavirus infection each year. An RV vaccine, introduced in
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 Researchers with the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center (UHCMC) have secured $4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) to establish an HIV-associated Malignancy Research Center (HAMRC) focused on lung cancer in East Africa.
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 9 2020 People who survive serious COVID-19 infections have long-lasting immune responses against the virus, according to a new study led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The study, published in Science Immunology, offers hope that people infected with the virus will develop lasting protection against reinfection. The study
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 8 2020 Pregnant women with severe or critical COVID-19 and their unborn infants face increased health risks before and after delivery, a Rutgers study finds. Meanwhile, the study, published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, also found that pregnant women with mild cases of coronavirus disease 2019 had
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A new study published on the preprint server medRxiv* in October 2020 shows that recognizing the differences in the population composition, connectedness and distribution, as well as inter-individual differences in immunity, susceptibility and infectivity, are crucial to estimating the herd immunity attained as a result of natural severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) more
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By Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Oct 7 2020 Thought LeadersDr. Gina PoeProfessorUniversity of California, Los Angeles In this interview, Dr. Gina Poe from UCLA speaks to News-Medical about why we sleep, and the importance of REM sleep for brain development. Sleep is critical to our everyday health. What provoked your research into sleep? We carried out this
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